Seasonal Flu Vaccine Available At PCC

The flu vaccine clinic at the Primary Care Centre is open for walk-ins from 1pm to 8pm on weekdays and from 8am to 2pm on weekends. Appointments can also be pre-booked by calling  200 52441.  

A statement from the GHA follows below:

The GHA has identified an increase in seasonal flu circulating in the community. Like every year,  it is important to take precautions to protect yourself and your loved ones from this potentially  dangerous virus, and to reduce the pressure on the GHA’s services. Simple every day actions like  washing hands and using tissues, and staying home if you feel unwell, are easy ways to do this.  

The flu vaccine clinic at the Primary Care Centre is open for walk-ins from 1pm to 8pm on  weekdays and from 8am to 2pm on weekends. Appointments can also be pre-booked by calling  200 52441.  

Mild flu symptoms can be managed at home with over-the counter medication, good hydration  and plenty of rest. If you are concerned about your symptoms, please seek advice from your  pharmacist first. This will help to reduce the pressure on GHA services through the winter peak.  

If you have any symptoms of the cold or flu, please do not visit loved ones at St Bernard’s hospital  or ERS, as this will put both vulnerable patients and core staff at risk. The flu can be extremely  dangerous for those who are elderly or already sick. Please wait until your symptoms are gone  and call the ward to arrange to speak to your loved ones on the phone in the meantime.  

The GHA Director General, Prof Patrick Geoghegan, said: ‘Flu season has come round again, like  it does every year. Winter always means a peak in demand on GHA services and resources. Please  help us to help you by taking sensible precautions to protect against the flu. This means washing  your hands, staying home if you feel unwell and speaking to your pharmacist first if you need  advice. If you have any cold or flu symptoms it is really important to stay away from the hospital  and ERS, to prevent it spreading to vulnerable patients and the vital staff that look after them.  That way, the GHA will be able to help everyone who needs it as quickly as possible.’